Open Access

Video ethics and young children

Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy20172:2

DOI: 10.1186/s40990-017-0012-9

Received: 19 December 2016

Accepted: 9 January 2017

Published: 20 February 2017

Abstract

This editorial starts an important discussion concerning the contemporary use of video that involves young children, including infants, in an age of visual culture within the open learned society that comprises the Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy. The author puts in motion an agenda for ethics committees and researchers to consider these issues carefully before determining the use of video involving young children in educational research.

Introduction

The ethics surrounding video with and for young children is a complex field. On the one hand international statutes protect the privacy of the child whilst on the other granting access to their ‘voice’. This editorial starts an important discussion concerning the contemporary use of video that involves young children, including infants, in an age of visual culture within the open learned society that comprises VJEP. The extent to which children can be seen and heard in this domain is contemplated in light of important considerations concerning rights, access, privacy and participation, to name but a few. Taken together, this editorial puts in motion an agenda for ethics committees and researchers to consider these issues carefully before ‘veto-ing’ the use of video involving young children.

The video is available to download if requested to editorial@videoeducationjournal.com. http://childethics.com/home/background/, https://creativecommons.org/licences, Derry et al. (2010), Elwick et al. (2014), Papademas (2009). (MOV 2049839 kb)

Declarations

Declarations

The parents of the children who feature in this video from Cambridge Early Learning Centre have given their written consent for their child’s image to be included in this footage, as have their teachers. Their consent has been approved by the University of Waikato Ethics Committee in a memo. The remaining footage was extracted from open access YouTube clips that are cited accordingly in the acknowledgements.

Competing interests

The author declares that she has no competing interests.

Other ethical agreements for consideration

World Medical Association, Declaration of Helsinki

US Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects

European Medicines Agency, Guidelines for good clinical practice

American Anthropological Association

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Te Whiringa School of Educational Leadership and Policy, University of Waikato

References

  1. http://childethics.com/home/background/
  2. https://creativecommons.org/licences
  3. Derry et al (2010) Conducting video research in the learning sciences: Guidance on selection, analysis, technology, and ethics. J Learn Sci 19(1):3–53View ArticleGoogle Scholar
  4. Elwick S, Bradley B, Sumsion J (2014) Infants as others: Uncertainties, difficulties and (im)possibilities in researching infants lives. Int J Qual Stud Educ 27(2):196–213View ArticleGoogle Scholar
  5. Papademas D and the International Visual Sociology Association (2009) IVSA Code of Research Ethics and Guidelines. Vis Stud 24(3):250–257Google Scholar

Copyright

© The Author(s) 2017